Megatrends by John Naisbitt (1982)

John Naisbitt is the author of book Megatrends which was pulished by Warner Books in 1982.  Although first written mainly to an American readership, Megatrends proved to be true in anticipating major shifts for the whole world.

One of the famous quotes from Megatrends states:

We are drowning in information, but starved for knowledge

More than 9 Million copies were sold in 58 countries, and it was on the New York Times Bestsellers list for two years, mostly as #1. Twenty years after its publication, Christoph Keese in the Financial Times looked back:

Once a decade, sometimes more often, a book about the economy is published that becomes a bestseller immediately and changes the relationship of people to economics. His predictions were astoundingly precise – though predictions, as Mark Twain’s one-liner says, are especially difficult if they are about the future.

# 1 New York Times Bestseller

Click here to view the John Naisbitt website

Megatrends John Naisbitt

Megatrends John Naisbitt

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Quote From Early Business Intelligence Pioneer Hans Peter Luhn

Quote

Hans Peter Luhn Business Intelligence Pioneer

Hans Peter Luhn was a computer scientist for IBM is considered to be the first pioneer of Business Intelligence

Hans Peter Luhn (July 1, 1896 – August 19, 1964) was a computer scientist for IBM, and creator of the Luhn algorithm and KWIC (Key Words In Context) indexing. He was awarded over 80 patents.  He is considered the first pioneer of Business Intelligence.

Luhn was born in Barmen, Germany (now part of Wuppertal) on July 1, 1896. He joined IBM as a senior research engineer in 1941, and soon became manager of the information retrieval research division.

Two of Luhn’s greatest achievements are the idea for an SDI system and the KWIC method of indexing. Today’s SDI systems owe a great deal to a 1958 paper by Luhn, “A Business Intelligence System”, which described an “automatic method to provide current awareness services to scientists and engineers” who needed help to cope with the rapid post-war growth of scientific and technical literature. Luhn apparently coined the term business intelligence in that paper.

Hans Peter Luhn defined business intelligence as follows:

The ability to apprehend the interrelationships of presented facts in such a way as to guide action towards a desired goal

 

Download A Business Intelligence System (Author Hans Peter Luhn) – IBM Journal October 1958 using the link below

PDF Download

PDF Download

 

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The Importance Of Having A Plan In Business

Plan to Succeed or Prepare to Fail

Plan to Succeed or Prepare to Fail

Q: WHAT ARE THE GOALS AND AMBITIONS FOR YOUR BUSINESS?
All businesses have different goals and ambitions.  For example some businesses decide to pursue a journey for high growth by increasing their sales and profits.  Other businesses may have a plan for consolidation within the business.  Other businesses may even be looking for an exit strategy to sell the business.

Whatever the goals are for your business, it is important that you have a plan on how your are intending to achieve these goals.  For example if you goal is high growth, how do you intend to achieve this?  i.e. do you intend to employ more sales staff or sell different products?  You also need to quantify what you are looking to achieve, for example increase sales turnover from £5 million to £10 million over three years with a gross profit percentage of 35%.  Finally you want to put a timeframe on when you are looking to achieve this plan.

SMART BUSINESS PLANNING USES SMART CRITERIA
All of these planning tasks that are required in order to achieve your objectives should form the basis of your plan.  Ensure at all times that each task meets the SMART crtieria (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time bound).  If it does not meet all the criteria then it should not be on the list.

TASK OWNERS AND ACCOUNTABILITY
Defining the tasks that need completing to deliver your business plan is a great start but who is going to complete these tasks?  The plan needs to be agreed by all of the team with clear roles and responsibilities being agreed with outline completion dates.  This is a key step in the process so that everyone within the team knows what they need to do.  It is very difficult to hold someone to account for not completing a task that has been asked of them if they have not agreed that they will complete this task.  Therefore the approach used at all times should be inclusive, not prescriptive.

REGULARLY REVIEW YOUR PLAN WITH THE TEAM
Agree with the team to regularly sit down and review the plan to ensure things are keeping on track.  Generate an action log which highlights issues raised by the team again with owners and planned completion dates.  As tasks are completed remove these from the action log.  Also do not forget to acknowledge and credit team members for the achievements they make.  Reward and recognition is a fundamental part of team building which is often overlooked in businesses.  Saying thank you costs nothing and will make your team members feel valued and part of a team with a purpose.

The importance of teamwork to deliver a plan

The importance of teamwork to deliver a plan

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